Why is my Dryer turning off too soon?

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Is your dryer shutting off too soon and not completing its cycle? Do you constantly go downstairs to check your clothes and they’re still wet! Then you have to dry it, wait for it, and go into your scary basement one more time. No worries, we are here to help you identify the parts in your dryer that would be causing it to turn off too soon. You may have to repair a certain part or call a technician to repair it for you.

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Product pick of the week: Thermal Fuse

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Welcome to our new series, every week we will be selecting a new part or product we sell and explaining its use and importance. This article will talk about Thermal fuses which are used for your drying machine. If your dryer is not heating it may be a faulty thermal. 1st Source Servall will explain how this part works and why it is important.

A thermal fuse is a safety part that’s purpose is to shut off the electrical flow that powers the heating mechanism when the exhaust becomes overheated. It is similar to an electrical fuse and it can’t be reset, it must be removed and replaced when it is worn out or broken.

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Whirlpool Electric Dryer not heating up? Your thermal fuse could be the problem.

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Have you noticed that your dryer isn’t heating up as much as it used to?  Maybe it’s not even heating up at all anymore? This may be due to a faulty thermal fuse in the back of your dryer, but don’t worry.  We will guide you through easy steps in testing and replacing a faulty thermal fuse if needed.

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More Dishwasher Help | Tips to Keep your Dishwasher Running Right

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Now that you’ve mastered loading your dishwasher, (if you don’t know what we’re talking about, click here), we’ve got a different set of quick tips for you today to keep it running right and potentially save you time and money.

Make sure your dishwasher is clean

If your dishwasher is dirty, your dishes will stay dirty.  Makes sense right? Continue reading

Why Isn’t My Dryer Heating Up? 5 Areas To Check on Your Dryer.

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If your dryer isn’t heating up like it used to, there are 5 areas to check.

  1. Proper Voltage
  2. Heating Element
  3. Thermal Fuse
  4. Thermostat
  5. Timer Motor

Proper Voltage: There are three ways to see if the proper amount of power is making it to your dryer.

(1) Making sure the dryer is properly plugged in.
(2) Check the circuit breaker to see if all the breakers are correct.
(3) Check for fuses in your fuse panel.

Heating Element: Once your heating element breaks, it is not fixable and will need to be replaced. It is possible to test your heating element by setting your multi-meter to the Rx1 resistance scale. Take each probe and place it at the end of the element.  If the results come back with infinite resistance, you will need to replace your heating element.

Thermal Fuse: Like the heating element, the thermal fuse is not repairable and will need to be replaced if it is broken. You will have to test the thermal fuse to see if it is working properly. To test the fuse, remove the wires that are leading to the thermal fuse. Take your multi-meter again and set it to the Rx1 setting. For best results, test the thermal fuse at room temperature, resulting in a reading of zero. If you test the thermal fuse when it is heated, a reading of infinity will be produced.

Thermostat: Dryers contain many thermostats to help control the internal temperature. Dryer thermostats are about an inch and a half long, oval shaped, and are connected to two wires. Remove these wires and use your multi-meter to test the thermostats. There should be results of either zero or infinity. If you do not receive either of these results, you need to replace the component.

Timer Motor: The dryer’s timer motor regulates the length of time that power is directed at each component. To find the motor, find the timer assembly. They are located behind the control console panel. Remove the wires from the motor. Set the ohmmeter to the Rx1 setting. A proper reading for dryers falls in the 2000 to 3000 ohms range. A proper reading can be found in the dryer’s owner manual.